An Accidental Jump into New London’s History

When I first met Laura Natusch, the Executive Director of New London Landmarks, I did not expect that agreeing to collaborate on a fair housing history project would literally take me all over the city of New London, Connecticut. We have done important (and fun) work

Flyer for educational event on New London's Lost Neighborhood, set for April 10th at 7pm at Mount Moriah Church in New London, CT.uncovering missing streets, and unearthing historic pictures and maps of this small Whaling City that rests on Long Island Sound.

In 1962, the City of New London passed a referendum to begin the Winthrop Cove Urban Renewal project. While some urban renewal projects are well documented and widely known, this specific slum removal plan is not. And because every untold story needs a voice, Laura and I went exploring to figure out how the built environment changed as a result of the Winthrop Cove Urban Renewal project, and how discrimination played a role.

1962 New London City Council meeting minutes

1962 New London City Council minutes.

The project found us deep in the dusty stacks of New London’s City Hall and reviewing months of microfilm at the City library. We have read old City Council minutes and walked the City to figure out exactly where the project took place and imagine what was lost. Volunteers and retired librarians have stepped in to help us, and every new finding feels kind of like the excitement of anticipating the next firework during a fourth of July display.

We can’t wait to share what we have learned and uncovered!

Please join the Connecticut Fair Housing Center, New London Landmarks, and our guest speaker Lonnie Braxton, former President of the NAACP New London Chapter, for a free educational event that will tell the story of how decades of discriminatory policies led to the divestment of one neighborhood, and how “urban renewal” removed it from the maps:

Discrimination, Urban Renewal, and New London’s Lost Neighborhood

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Mount Moriah Church, 27 Moore Ave. New London, CT

7:00pm – 8:30pm

Refreshments from Washington Street Coffee House will be provided!

Save the Date – 39th Annual FHACt Conference

The Fair Housing Association of Connecticut (FHACt)’s 39th annual Fair Housing Conference is set for April 26th in Rocky Hill.  The 2018 Conference will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act, discuss the issues of the day, and reinvigorate us as we look ahead.

The event will include a screening of “A House Divided,” the episode from last year’s acclaimed America Divided series exploring housing discrimination, segregation, and fair housing enforcement in New York City.   Following the screening, the Center will present on some of our recent fair housing testing results and other research to reveal what these issues look like here in Connecticut. The Center will then join staff from the CT Commission on Human Rights & Opportunities (CHRO) in facilitating an interactive exercise on using the concepts from “A House Divided” to spur action.

The conference’s keynote speaker will be Debby Goldberg from the National Fair Housing Alliance, and there will also be a presentation on housing for formerly incarcerated people by “The Real Women of Orange is the New Black.”

We hope to see you on April 26th!

Click here to see full details and learn how to register for the 2018 FHACt Conference.


Community Research on Eviction

Trinity College’s new Liberal Arts Action Lab at 10 Constitution Plaza, Hartford.  Photo retrieved from:

Research shows that people of color, women, and families with children are disproportionately impacted by eviction.  The Center’s Staff Attorney Salmun Kazerounian and Education & Outreach Coordinator Fionnuala Darby-Hudgens are working with students from Trinity College and Capital Community College at the Liberal Arts Action Lab to investigate the effects of eviction on residents of the greater Hartford area.

Inspired by the book Evicted by Matthew Desmond, the Center hopes to develop a greater understanding of who is most affected by eviction and how Connecticut families cope after an eviction.

Facing Eviction or Need Housing in Connecticut?

Connecticut Legal Services

Connecticut 2-1-1


Additional Research on Eviction:

Evicting Children

Eviction and the Reproduction of Urban Poverty, by Matthew Desmond

Welcome to Our New Blog!

The Center is excited to announce our new blog!  We’ll be highlighting updates about the Center’s work, providing our perspective on fair housing news and issues from Connecticut and beyond, telling the stories of those most impacted by housing discrimination and foreclosure, and sharing helpful information about housing opportunities in Connecticut.

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