Fair Housing COVID-19 Daily Response 5.13.2020

ADDRESSING CLIENTS’ NEEDS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

May 13, 2020

Call to Action: Connecticut just received $11,439,547 in CARES Act funding. Call Governor Lamont at 860-566-4840 or tweet @govnedlamont and ask that this money be used for the Rental Market Stabilization Fund to help tenants stay in their homes. To get more information about the Rental Market Stabilization Fund, click here.

Call to Action:  Tenants in Connecticut are calling on Governor Lamont to stop all evictions indefinitely and cancel the obligation to pay rent. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic and economic shutdown, over 50% of renters across the state were cost-burdened, paying more than 30% of their income on housing costs. Connecticut leads the nation in income inequality, and this burden is disproportionately shouldered by Black and brown communities: nearly 60% of Black renters and 55% of Hispanic renters are cost-burdened compared to 43% of white renters. For more information on the tenants’ demands and to sign the petition, click here. To participate in the daily actions on Mondays and Wednesday, click here.

Important Deadlines:  Protections for tenants expire in 18 days. There is currently no extension of rental payments due June 1st, and no relief for renters, with the eviction moratorium ending June 30th.

What happened on May 12, 2020:

  • The National Low Income Housing Coalition calculates rental assistance need at $100 billion: The National Low Income Housing Coalition recently found that providing temporary rental assistance to current and projected severely cost-burdened renters will cost $76.1 billion nationwide over the next twelve months. Extending rental assistance to cover all current and projected housing cost-burdened extremely and very low-income renters would cost approximately $99.5 billion. To read NLIHC’s report click here. NLIHC estimates that nearly 97,000 Connecticut tenants will need $1,000 each month in rental assistance to pay rent for 12 months. To pay rent from May through September, the estimated cost for CT is $750,000,000. Connecticut is currently planning to spend $2.8 million. To see NLIHC’s calculations, click here.
  • Cancel rent: The social safety net is not adequate to assist tenants and homeowners who are low-income and those that have lost their jobs during the pandemic. In addition, news organizations continue to document the toll that years of discrimination and segregation have taken on the housing options for people who are African-American. The incomplete actions of state and federal officials to address this crisis could result in hundreds of thousands of evictions and foreclosures by late summer which would trigger a new wave of infection and illness. Federal and state governments can prevent this from happening by acting now. For more information on the looming threat of homelessness for hundreds of thousands of people who will not be able to pay the rent, click here.
  • Where low-income jobs are being lost to COVID-19: Southeastern Connecticut is expected to be the hardest hit region in the State due to the region’s economic dependency on tourism and service sector work with an estimated 12,491 jobs lost. Read more here in a report from the Urban Institute.
  • Mortgages in forbearance continue to grow: The Mortgage Bankers Association reports that, as of the week ended May 3, 7.91% of all active mortgages – more than 1:13 – are in forbearance. Nearly 11% of all FHA/VA mortgages are in forbearance. These totals are expected to increase when as homeowners make new requests for forbearance as May’s mortgage payments come due. For more information on this story, click here.
  • Outreach: Staff attorney, Pam Heller, will join the Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence on Wednesday, May 20th from 1:45-2:45 for a Facebook Live discussion on current housing issues facing survivors of domestic violence. We will post details on how to join the training on Thursday, May 14th.
  • Outreach: The Center is hosting a remote training on the design and construction requirements of the federal Fair Housing Act on Wednesday, May 27 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. This program is registered with the American Institute of Architects. Architects will receive up to 6 continuing education HSW credits. For more information, click here. To register, click here.
  • Outreach: Staff continue to hold fair housing trainings and COVID-19 housing resource workshops via Zoom with social service agencies, direct service providers, and invested stakeholders. If your agency would find a short resource webinar or fair housing training helpful during this crisis please contact Shaznene Hussain, the Center’s Education and Outreach Coordinator, at Shussain@ctfairhousing.org

Still needed to ensure housing stability:

  • Help for tenants who cannot pay their rent.
  • Payments to landlords to allow them to maintain their buildings and continue to provide housing.
  • Bar on mortgage companies filing foreclosure complaints. More than 700 have been filed since the Governor declared a public health and civil preparedness emergency, including several that are banned by the agreement banks and credit unions struck with the Governor and the Department of Banking.
  • Municipalities need to comply with Executive Order 7S and make it easy for their constituents to participate in either a tax deferral or reduced interest program.

Resources for tenants and homeowners:

  • Click here to understand current tenant rent relief options in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to find more details in our tenant FAQ.
  • Click here to understand current rights for homeowners in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to understand how fair housing can protect you during the COVID-19 crisis. (Recently added Tagalog and Khmer translations to our guidance now available in 11 languages.)
  • Need to have your subsidized rent recalculated due to income loss? The Rent Recalculation Request tool can be accessed here in Spanish and English.
  • To sign up for our daily update fill out the form

 

More external COVID-19 resources can be found on our website here.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR FAIR HOUSING RIGHTS IN ENGLISH, SPANISH, MANDARIN, VIETNAMESE, FARSI, RUSSIAN, ITALIAN, KREYOL, ARABIC, KHMER, AND TAGALOG, CLICK HERE.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER (@CTFAIRHOUSING) FOR UPDATES THROUGHOUT THE DAY.

Fair Housing COVID-19 Daily Response 5.12.2020

 

ADDRESSING CLIENTS’ NEEDS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

May 12, 2020

Call to Action: Connecticut just received more than $11,439,547 in CARES Act funding. Call Governor Lamont at 860-566-4840 or tweet @govnedlamont #savetherent and ask that this money be used for the Rental Market Stabilization Fund to help tenants stay in their homes. To get more information about the Rental Market Stabilization Fund, click here.

Call to Action:  Tenants in Connecticut are calling on Governor Lamont to stop all evictions indefinitely and cancel the obligation to pay rent. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic and economic shutdown, over 50% of renters across the state were cost-burdened, paying more than 30% of their income on housing costs. Connecticut leads the nation in income inequality, and this burden is disproportionately shouldered by Black and brown communities: nearly 60% of Black renters and 55% of Hispanic renters are cost-burdened compared to 43% of white renters. For more information on the tenants’ demands and to sign the petition, click here. To participate in the daily actions on Mondays and Wednesday, click here.

 

Important Deadlines:  Tenants who did not pay May rent were supposed to notify their landlords in writing by May 10, 2020 that they can’t pay rent due to full or partial unemployment, or significant loss in revenue or increase in expenses due to the pandemic to get a 60-day extension to pay the rent.

If you did not send a letter by May 10, you should still use the letter and text templates to request rental payment extension from your landlord, click here.

Resources for tenants and homeowners:

  • Click here to understand current tenant rent relief options in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to find more details in our tenant FAQ.
  • Click here to understand current rights for homeowners in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to understand how fair housing can protect you during the COVID-19 crisis. (Recently added Tagalog and Khmer translations to our guidance now available in 11 languages.)
  • Need to have your subsidized rent recalculated due to income loss? The Rent Recalculation Request tool can be accessed here in Spanish and English.
  • To sign up for our daily update fill out the form

 

What happened on May 11, 2020:

 

  • Immigrant communities and communities of color frustrated at the lack of testing: People living in low-income communities that are majority people of color continue to face barriers to virus testing and other services. There are only a handful of walk-up testing sites in the state which prohibits those without cars from getting tested. Most of the community health centers in these neighborhoods do not have the supplies needed to expand testing. People living in inner-city neighborhoods also warn that communication about the disease and how to get assistance has been confusing, that financial support for those who have lost their jobs has been sluggish, and that hunger is now a real threat for many blacks and Latinos living in poverty-stricken areas. For more information on the hurdles faced by communities of color,

click here.

  • The Cities We Need: The New York Times Editorial Board published an opinion piece that echoes many of the issues that the Center has seen in its work over the past 26 years and that have been exacerbated by the COVID-19 crisis. As the Editorial Board states: “Our cities are broken because affluent Americans have been segregating themselves from the poor, and our best hope for building a fairer, stronger nation is to break down those barriers . . . But to realize the potential of cities, we need to change the harsh reality that the neighborhoods into which Americans are born delimit their prospects in life: their chances of graduating from high school, of earning a decent living, of surviving into old age.” The Center’s policies and practices include efforts to both ensure that there is adequate affordable housing in cities as well as in the non-urban areas. For more information on the Center’s work to both promote integration and prevent discrimination, go its website at ctfairhousing.org.
  • Mortgages in forbearance continue to grow: The Mortgage Bankers Association reports that, as of the week ended May 3, 7.91% of all active mortgages – more than 1:13 – are in forbearance. Nearly 11% of all FHA/VA mortgages are in forbearance. These totals are expected to increase when as homeowners make new requests for forbearance as May’s mortgage payments come due. For more information on this story, click here.
  • Outreach: Staff attorney will join the Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence on Wednesday, May 20 from 1:45-2:45 for a Facebook Live discussion on current housing issues facing survivors of domestic violence. We will post details on how to join the training on Thursday, May 14..
  • Outreach: Staff continue to hold fair housing trainings and COVID-19 housing resource workshops via Zoom with social service agencies, direct service providers, and invested stakeholders. If your agency would find a short resource webinar or fair housing training helpful during this crisis please contact Shaznene Hussain, the Center’s Education and Outreach Coordinator, at Shussain@ctfairhousing.org

 

Still needed to ensure housing stability:

 

  • Help for tenants who cannot pay their rent.
  • Payments to landlords to allow them to maintain their buildings and continue to provide housing.
  • Bar on mortgage companies filing foreclosure complaints. More than 700 have been filed since the Governor declared a public health and civil preparedness emergency, including several that are banned by the agreement banks and credit unions struck with the Governor and the Department of Banking.
  • Municipalities need to comply with Executive Order 7S and make it easy for their constituents to participate in either a tax deferral or reduced interest program.

 

More external COVID-19 resources can be found on our website here.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR FAIR HOUSING RIGHTS IN ENGLISH, SPANISH, MANDARIN, VIETNAMESE, FARSI, RUSSIAN, ITALIAN, KREYOL, ARABIC, KHMER, AND TAGALOG, CLICK HERE.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER (@CTFAIRHOUSING) FOR UPDATES THROUGHOUT THE DAY.

Fair Housing COVID-19 Response 5.11.2020


ADDRESSING CLIENTS’ NEEDS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

May 11, 2020

Call to Action: Connecticut just received more than $11,439,547 in CARES Act funding. Call Governor Lamont at 860-566-4840 or tweet @govnedlamont #savetherent and ask that this money be used for the Rental Market Stabilization Fund to help tenants stay in their homes. To get more information about the Rental Market Stabilization Fund, click here.

Call to Action:  Tenants in Connecticut are calling on Governor Lamont to stop all evictions indefinitely and cancel the obligation to pay rent. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic and economic shutdown, over 50% of renters across the state were cost-burdened, paying more than 30% of their income on housing costs. Connecticut leads the nation in income inequality, and this burden is disproportionately shouldered by Black and brown communities: nearly 60% of Black renters and 55% of Hispanic renters are cost-burdened compared to 43% of white renters. For more information on the tenants’ demands and to sign the petition, click here. To participate in the daily actions on Mondays and Wednesday, click here.

 

Call to Action:  Ask Senator Murphy to sign on to the Emergency Rental Assistance and Rental Market Stabilization Act. Call Senator Chris Murphy at 202-224-4041 or 860-549-8463, contact him via website form, or tweet @ChrisMurphyCT support #RentReliefNow 

 

Important Deadlines:  Tenants who did not pay May rent were supposed to notify their landlords in writing by May 10, 2020 that they can’t pay rent due to full or partial unemployment, or significant loss in revenue or increase in expenses due to the pandemic to get a 60-day extension to pay the rent.

If you did not send a letter by May 10, you should still use the letter and text templates to request rental payment extension from your landlord, click here.

Resources for tenants and homeowners:

  • Click here to understand current tenant rent relief options in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to find more details in our tenant FAQ.
  • Click here to understand current rights for homeowners in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to understand how fair housing can protect you during the COVID-19 crisis. (Recently added Tagalog and Khmer translations to our guidance now available in 11 languages.)
  • Need to have your subsidized rent recalculated due to income loss? The Rent Recalculation Request tool can be accessed here in Spanish and English.
  • To sign up for our daily update fill out the form

 

What happened on May 8, 2020:

 

  • HUD announces an additional $11,439,547 in CARES Act funding: HUD has released another $11 million in CARES Act funding for the State of Connecticut for to assist renters that may have difficulty paying rent and homeowners having difficulty paying their mortgage, among other activities. For more information, click here.
  • Congressional Senators and Representatives request rental and mortgage assistance: Because so many tenants cannot pay rent, Senators Sherrod Brown and Maxine Waters are asking Congress to provide $100 billion in emergency rental mortgage assistance. To read more about this bill, click here. All of Connecticut’s House Representatives and Senator Blumenthal have signed on as co-sponsors on this bill. Ask Senator Murphy to sign on, by calling:
    • Senator Chris Murphy: 202-224-4041 or 860-549-8463
    • Or send an email from the National Low Income Housing Coalition website by clicking here
    • And tweet your support using the hashtag #RentReliefNow!
  • Mortgages in forbearance continue to grow: Black Knight reports that, as of May 7, there were1 million loans in forbearance, up from 3.8 million in the company’s last report which covered plans put into effect by mortgage servicers through April 30. The new total represents 7.3 percent of all active mortgages and accounts for $890 billion of unpaid mortgage principal. These totals are expected to increase when May forbearance numbers are released. For more information on this story, click here.
  • Outreach: Stay tuned for two important webinars coming soon. We will present on COVID-19 related housing discrimination and temporary eviction protections.
  • Outreach: Staff continue to hold fair housing trainings and COVID-19 housing resource workshops via Zoom with social service agencies, direct service providers, and invested stakeholders. If your agency would find a short resource webinar or fair housing training helpful during this crisis please contact Shaznene Hussain, the Center’s Education and Outreach Coordinator, at Shussain@ctfairhousing.org

 

Still needed to ensure housing stability:

 

  • Help for tenants who cannot pay their rent.
  • Payments to landlords to allow them to maintain their buildings and continue to provide housing.
  • Bar on mortgage companies filing foreclosure complaints. More than 850 have been filed since the Governor declared a public health and civil preparedness emergency, including several that are banned by the agreement banks and credit unions struck with the Governor and the Department of Banking.
  • Municipalities need to comply with Executive Order 7S and make it easy for their constituents to participate in either a tax deferral or reduced interest program.

 

More external COVID-19 resources can be found on our website here.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR FAIR HOUSING RIGHTS IN ENGLISH, SPANISH, MANDARIN, VIETNAMESE, FARSI, RUSSIAN, ITALIAN, KREYOL, ARABIC, KHMER, AND TAGALOG, CLICK HERE.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER (@CTFAIRHOUSING) FOR UPDATES THROUGHOUT THE DAY.

Fair Housing COVID-19 Response 5.6.2020

To read a PDF version of this update click here.

ADDRESSING CLIENTS’ NEEDS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

May 6, 2020

Call to Action:  Ask Senator Murphy to sign on to the Emergency Rental Assistance and Rental Market Stabilization Act. Call Senator Chris Murphy at 202-224-4041 or 860-549-8463, contact via website form, or tweet @ChrisMurphyCT support #RentReliefNow 

Important Deadlines:  Tenants who know they cannot pay May rent must notify their landlord in writing by May 10, 2020 that they can’t pay rent due to full or partial unemployment, or significant loss in revenue or increase in expenses due to the pandemic to get a 60-day extension to pay the rent.

For letter and text templates to request rental payment extension from your landlord, click here.

Resources for tenants and homeowners:

  • Click here to understand current tenant rent relief options in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to find more details in our tenant FAQ.
  • Click here to understand current rights for homeowners in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to understand how fair housing can protect you during the COVID-19 crisis. (Recently added Tagalog and Khmer translations to our guidance now available in 11 languages.)
  • Need to have your subsidized rent recalculated due to income loss? The Rent Recalculation Request tool can be accessed here in Spanish and English.
  • To sign up for our daily update fill out the form

Fair housing issues and COVID-19:

  • Many tenants have called the Center because their landlord is insisting on showing their apartment to prospective tenants or to potential buyers. While this is not a fair housing issue, it does raise serious problems regarding the spread of the COVID-19 virus. The Connecticut landlord-tenant laws state that a tenant may not unreasonably withhold consent to a landlord who wants to show a unit, do repairs, etc. However, given the current COVID-19 emergency, refusing entry to a landlord or real estate agent to show an apartment may not be unreasonable. For additional information, click here.

What happened on May 5, 2020:

  • Congressional Senators and Representatives file bill requesting rental assistance: Because so many tenants cannot pay rent, Senators Sherrod Brown and Maxine Waters are asking Congress to provide $100 billion in emergency rental assistance. To read more about this bill, click here. Since yesterday’s update, all of Connecticut’s House Representatives and Senator Blumenthal have signed on as co-sponsors on this bill. Ask Senator Murphy to sign on, by calling:
    • Senator Chris Murphy: 202-224-4041 or 860-549-8463
    • Or send an email from the National Low Income Housing Coalition website by clicking here
    • And tweet your support using the hashtag #RentReliefNow!
  • COVID-19 continues to disproportionately affect people of color: People who are African-American have an infection rate of more than 2.3 times the rate of whites while Latinos an infection rate that is 2 times the rate of whites. In addition, they continue to show higher death rates than whites. For more on this, click here.
  • Mortgages in forbearance continue to grow: The Mortgage Bankers Association has confirmed that the percentage of mortgages in forbearance rose to 7.54% or 1 in 13 mortgages. This means that at least that many mortgages will be 90+ days behind by August, and that we will be seeing delinquency numbers as high as the height of Great Recession before summer ends. Analysts expect these numbers to grow once again as May mortgage payments become due. For more information on this story, click here.
  • Outreach: Tune in tomorrow night at 5:30 on Facebook Live to the Connecticut Legislative Black & Puerto Rican Caucus Tele-Town Hall to hear Center staff Shaznene Hussain and Fionnuala Darby-Hudgens discuss housing needs as the relate to low income residents and communities of color. For more information, click
  • Outreach: Stay tuned for two important webinars coming soon. We will present on COVID-19 related housing discrimination and temporary eviction protections.
  • Outreach: Staff continue to hold fair housing trainings and COVID-19 housing resource workshops via Zoom with social service agencies, direct service providers, and invested stakeholders. If your agency would find a short resource webinar or fair housing training helpful during this crisis please contact Shaznene Hussain, the Center’s Education and Outreach Coordinator, at Shussain@ctfairhousing.org

Still needed to ensure housing stability:

  • Help for tenants who cannot pay their rent.
  • Payments to landlords to allow them to maintain their buildings and continue to provide housing.
  • Bar on mortgage companies filing foreclosure complaints. More than 850 have been filed since the Governor declared a public health and civil preparedness emergency, including several that are banned by the agreement banks and credit unions struck with the Governor and the Department of Banking.
  • Municipalities need to comply with Executive Order 7S and make it easy for their constituents to participate in either a tax deferral or reduced interest program.

More external COVID-19 resources can be found on our website here.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR FAIR HOUSING RIGHTS IN ENGLISH, SPANISH, MANDARIN, VIETNAMESE, FARSI, RUSSIAN, ITALIAN, KREYOL, ARABIC, KHMER, AND TAGALOG, CLICK HERE.

 

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER (@CTFAIRHOUSING) FOR UPDATES THROUGHOUT THE DAY.

Fair Housing COVID-19 Daily Response 5.5.2020

For a PDF view of this update click here.

 ADDRESSING CLIENTS’ NEEDS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

May 5, 2020

CALL TO ACTION: Please call your congressional representatives and ask them to support $100 billion in emergency rental assistance. The details and phone numbers are listed below.

Important Deadlines:  Tenants who know they cannot pay May rent must notify their landlord in writing by May 10, 2020 that they can’t pay rent due to full or partial unemployment, or significant loss in revenue or increase in expenses due to the pandemic to get a 60-day extension to pay the rent.

For letter and text templates to request rental payment extension from your landlord, click here.

Resources for tenants and homeowners:

  • Click here to understand current tenant rent relief options in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to find more details in our tenant FAQ.
  • Click here to understand current rights for homeowners in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to understand how fair housing can protect you during the COVID-19 crisis. (Recently added Tagalog and Khmer translations to our guidance now available in 11 languages.)
  • Need to have your subsidized rent recalculated due to income loss? The Rent Recalculation Request tool can be accessed here in Spanish and English.
  • To sign up for our daily update fill out the form

Fair housing issues and COVID-19:

  • Many tenants have called the Center because their landlord is insisting on showing their apartment to prospective tenants or to potential buyers. While this is not a fair housing issue, it does raise serious problems regarding the spread of the COVID-19 virus. The Connecticut landlord-tenant laws state that a tenant may not unreasonably withhold consent to a landlord who wants to show a unit, do repairs, etc. However, given the current COVID-19 emergency, refusing entry to a landlord or real estate agent to show an apartment may not be unreasonable. For additional information, click here.

What happened on May 4, 2020:

  • Schools closed for the duration of the academic year: Governor Lamont announced that all K – 12 schools will continue remotely through the end of the academic year. Schools will continue to provide meals to children under the school breakfast and lunch programs for consumption at home. There has been no decision made about summer school programming. For more information, click here.
  • Congressional Senators and Representatives file bill requesting rental assistance: Because so many tenants cannot pay rent, Senators Sherrod Brown and Maxine Waters are asking Congress to provide $100 billion in emergency rental assistance. To read more about this bill, click here. Since yesterday’s update, Representative Rosa DeLauro and Representative Jim Himes joined Representative Jahana Hayes as co-sponsors on this bill. Ask your Congressional Senators and Representative to sign on, by calling:
    • Representative Joe Courtney: 202-225-2076 or 860-886-0139
    • Representative John Larson: 202-225-2265 or 860-278-8888
    • Senator Chris Murphy: 202-224-4041 or 860-549-8463
    • Senator Richard Blumenthal: 202-224-2823 or 860-258-6940
    • Or send an email from the National Low Income Housing Coalition website by clicking here
    • And tweet your support using the hashtag #RentReliefNow!
  • Access to information about public benefits: On Wednesday, May 6 from 2 – 3 p.m., Greater Hartford Legal and the Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence will discuss and answer questions regarding access to public benefits during COVID-19. Topics covered will include unemployment insurance, housing stability and evictions, and access to food and medical benefits. They will outline COVID-19 related expansions and extensions of benefits, as well as the process of obtaining benefits via the phone or internet.

Meeting Link: https://bit.ly/CCADVWeeklyWebinars-PublicBenefits

  • Mortgages in forbearance continue to grow: the Mortgage Bankers Association has confirmed According to Black Knight, a company that collects and provides considerable mortgage industry data, the percentage of mortgages in forbearances rose to 7.54% or 1 in 13 mortgages. This means that at least that many mortgages will be 90+ days behind by August, and that we will be seeing delinquency numbers as high as the height of Great Recession before summer ends. Analysts expect these numbers to grow once again as May mortgage payments become due. For more information on this story, click here.
  • Outreach: Stay tuned for two important webinars coming soon. We will present on COVID-19 related housing discrimination and temporary eviction protections.
  • Outreach: Staff continue to hold fair housing trainings and COVID-19 housing resource workshops via Zoom with social service agencies, direct service providers, and invested stakeholders. If your agency would find a short resource webinar or fair housing training helpful during this crisis please contact Shaznene Hussain, the Center’s Education and Outreach Coordinator, at Shussain@ctfairhousing.org

Still needed to ensure housing stability:

  • Help for tenants who cannot pay their rent.
  • Payments to landlords to allow them to maintain their buildings and continue to provide housing.
  • Bar on mortgage companies filing foreclosure complaints. More than 850 have been filed since the Governor declared a public health and civil preparedness emergency, including several that are banned by the agreement banks and credit unions struck with the Governor and the Department of Banking.
  • Municipalities need to comply with Executive Order 7S and make it easy for their constituents to participate in either a tax deferral or reduced interest program.

More external COVID-19 resources can be found on our website here

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR FAIR HOUSING RIGHTS IN ENGLISH, SPANISH, MANDARIN, VIETNAMESE, FARSI, RUSSIAN, ITALIAN, KREYOL, ARABIC, KHMER, AND TAGALOG, CLICK HERE.

 

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER (@CTFAIRHOUSING) FOR UPDATES THROUGHOUT THE DAY.

 

Fair Housing COVID-19 Response Effort 5.4.2020

To view a PDF version of this update click here.

ADDRESSING CLIENTS’ NEEDS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

May 4, 2020

Important Deadlines:  Tenants who know they cannot pay May rent must notify their landlord in writing by May 10, 2020 that they can’t pay rent due to full or partial unemployment, or significant loss in revenue or increase in expenses due to the pandemic to get a 60-day extension to pay the rent.

For letter and text templates to request rental payment extension from your landlord, click here.

Resources for tenants and homeowners:

  • Click here to understand current tenant rent relief options in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to find more details in our tenant FAQ.
  • Click here to understand current rights for homeowners in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to understand how fair housing can protect you during the COVID-19 crisis. (Recently added Tagalog and Khmer translations to our guidance now available in 11 languages.)
  • Need to have your subsidized rent recalculated due to income loss? The Rent Recalculation Request tool can be accessed here in Spanish and English.
  • To sign up for our daily update fill out the form

 

Fair housing issues and COVID-19:

  • If your landlord or another tenant is harassing you because they believe you have been infected with the virus or because you are disabled, this may be a violation of the fair housing laws. Call the Center at 888-247-4401; or, email us at info@ctfairhousing.org; or, check our website at ctfairhousing.org for more information.
  • Many tenants have called the Center because their landlord is insisting on showing their apartment to prospective tenants or to potential buyers. While this is not a fair housing issue, it does raise serious problems regarding the spread of the COVID-19 virus. The Connecticut landlord-tenant laws state that a tenant may not unreasonably withhold consent to a landlord who wants to show a unit, do repairs, etc. However, given the current COVID-19 emergency, refusing entry to a landlord or real estate agent to show an apartment may not be unreasonable. For additional information, click here.

What happened on May 1, 2020:

  • Congressional Senators and Representatives file bill requesting rental assistance: Because so many tenants cannot pay rent, Senators Sherrod Brown and Maxine Waters are asking Congress to provide $100 billion in emergency rental assistance. To read more about this bill, click here. To date, only the only Connecticut Congressional representative to have signed on as a co-sponsor is Representative Jahana Hayes. Ask your Congressional Senators and Representative to sign on, by calling:
    • Representative Joe Courtney: 202-225-2076 or 860-886-0139
    • Representative John Larson: 202-225-2265 or 860-278-8888
    • Representative Jim Himes: 202-225-5541 or 203-333-6600
    • Representative Rosa DeLauro: 202-225-3661 or 203-562-3718
    • Senator Chris Murphy: 202-224-4041 or 860-549-8463
    • Senator Richard Blumenthal: 202-224-2823 or 860-258-6940
    • Or send an email from the National Low Income Housing Coalition website by clicking here
    • And tweet your support using the hashtag #RentReliefNow!
  • Access to information about public benefits: On Wednesday, May 6 from 2 – 3 p.m., Greater Hartford Legal and the Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence will discuss and answer questions regarding access to public benefits during COVID-19. Topics covered will include unemployment insurance, housing stability and evictions, and access to food and medical benefits. They will outline COVID-19 related expansions and extensions of benefits, as well as the process of obtaining benefits via the phone or internet.

Meeting Link: https://bit.ly/CCADVWeeklyWebinars-PublicBenefits

  • CHFA launches streamlined process to provide financial relief to borrowers: Any owner of a multifamily rental housing development in CHFA’s portfolio who is experiencing financial distress due to COVID-19, beyond the financial ability of the mortgagor to correct or mitigate, may contact CHFA to request its assistance. CHFA has streamlined its process to provide timely response to the mortgagor by instituting a two-step process (1) Initial Determination, and (2) Application for Forbearance Due to COVID-19. For more information, click here.
  • Mortgages in forbearance continue to grow: According to Black Knight, a company that collects and provides considerable mortgage industry data, the percentage of mortgages in forbearances rose to 7.3%. This means that at least that many mortgages will be 90+ days behind by August, and that we will be seeing delinquency numbers as high as the height of Great Recession before summer ends. Analysts expect these numbers to grow once again as May mortgage payments become due. For more information on this story, click here.
  • Outreach: Stay tuned for two important webinars coming soon. We will present on COVID-19 related housing discrimination and temporary eviction protections.
  • Outreach: Staff continue to hold fair housing trainings and COVID-19 housing resource workshops via Zoom with social service agencies, direct service providers, and invested stakeholders. If your agency would find a short resource webinar or fair housing training helpful during this crisis please contact Shaznene Hussain, the Center’s Education and Outreach Coordinator, at Shussain@ctfairhousing.org

 Still needed to ensure housing stability:

  • Help for tenants who cannot pay their rent.
  • Payments to landlords to allow them to maintain their buildings and continue to provide housing.
  • Bar on mortgage companies filing foreclosure complaints. More than 850 have been filed since the Governor declared a public health and civil preparedness emergency, including several that are banned by the agreement banks and credit unions struck with the Governor and the Department of Banking.
  • Municipalities need to comply with Executive Order 7S and make it easy for their constituents to participate in either a tax deferral or reduced interest program.

More external COVID-19 resources can be found on our website here.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR FAIR HOUSING RIGHTS IN ENGLISH, SPANISH, MANDARIN, VIETNAMESE, FARSI, RUSSIAN, ITALIAN, KREYOL, ARABIC, KHMER, AND TAGALOG, CLICK HERE.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER (@CTFAIRHOUSING) FOR UPDATES THROUGHOUT THE DAY.

Fair Housing COVID-19 Response 5.1.20

To view a PDF version of this update click here.

 

ADDRESSING CLIENTS’ NEEDS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

May 1, 2020

Important Deadlines:  Tenants who know they cannot pay May rent must notify their landlord in writing by May 10, 2020 that they can’t pay rent due to full or partial unemployment, or significant loss in revenue or increase in expenses due to the pandemic to get a 60-day extension to pay the rent.

For letter and text templates to request rental payment extension from your landlord, click here.

Resources for tenants and homeowners:

  • Click here to understand current tenant rent relief options in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to find more details in our tenant FAQ.
  • Click here to understand current rights for homeowners in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to understand how fair housing can protect you during the COVID-19 crisis. (Recently added Tagalog and Khmer translations to our guidance now available in 11 languages.)
  • Need to have your subsidized rent recalculated due to income loss? The Rent Recalculation Request tool can be accessed here in Spanish and English.
  • To sign up for our daily update fill out the form

Fair housing issues and COVID-19:

  • Many tenants have called the Center because their landlord is insisting on showing their apartment to prospective tenants or to potential buyers. While this is not a fair housing issue, it does raise serious problems regarding the spread of the COVID-19 virus. The Connecticut landlord-tenant laws state that a tenant may not unreasonably withhold consent to a landlord who wants to show a unit, do repairs, etc. However, given the current COVID-19 emergency, refusing entry to a landlord or real estate agent to show an apartment may not be unreasonable. For additional information, click here.
  • Landlords have been refusing to do needed repair work in apartments because they believe the tenant has COVID-19. If the tenant is disabled, this may be housing discrimination. For more information about the fair housing rights of people who are disabled in Spanish and English, click here. If the repair is an emergency or is severely interfering with your use of the apartment, call the Board of Health in your town. They are still required to act on emergencies.

 

What happened on April 30, 2020:

  • Connecticut Legal Rights Project sues state for not protecting inpatient psychiatric patients: Despite the death of 51 hospitalized psychiatric patients and a high infection rate among staff, the State has done nothing to release patients to protect them from COVID-19 and to create space so that people remaining in hospitals can practice social distancing. The lawsuit asks the Court to order the state to assess every patient at Connecticut Valley and Whiting Forensic hospitals to determine who can be released and to order all necessary supports and services to be provided in the community. For more on this story, click here.
  • Tenants cannot pay rent: Tenant groups across the country are encouraging renters to withhold May rent since there has been no rental assistance to tenants. To read more about this movement, click here and here. Before the recent economic crisis began, more than 74% of Connecticut tenants were rent burdened meaning they paid more than 30% of their income in rent. As a result, money received from the CARES Act stimulus payments and enhanced unemployment benefits are not enough to pay rent and feed families. The Center and other housing advocates asked the Department of Housing to create a rental market stabilization program to assist both tenants and landlords. To see a copy of the comments sent to the Department of Housing, click here.
  • Advice from HUD to tenants: HUD issued a new brochure for tenants living in assisted housing. The brochure does not apply to public housing, Section 8 moderate rehab housing or the housing choice voucher program. The brochure reminds tenants that although rent is still due, tenants with HUD-funded rental assistance who have experienced a decrease in income should notify their landlords and ask for an income recertification. The Center’s Rent Recalculation Request tool can help with this and can be accessed here in Spanish and English. To read HUD’s brochure, click here.
  • Borrowers need clarification on forbearance repayments: While Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac each issued statements that borrowers are not required to repay the payments missed during a forbearance all at once when the forbearance period ends, many other loan services have not given that directive to their borrowers. Many borrowers in forbearance have been told they must come up with a lump sum payment at the end of the forbearance period or face foreclosure. For more on this story, click here. For more information on the guidance sent out by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, click here.
  • Mortgages in forbearance continue to grow: According to Black Knight, a company that collects and provides considerable mortgage industry data, the percentage of mortgages in forbearances rose to 7.3%. This means that at least that many mortgages will be 90+ days behind by August, and that we will be seeing delinquency numbers as high as the height of Great Recession before summer ends. Analysts expect these numbers to grow once again as May mortgage payments become due. For more information on this story, click here.
  • Outreach: Stay tuned for two important webinars coming soon. We will present on COVID-19 related housing discrimination and temporary eviction protections.
  • Outreach: Staff continue to hold fair housing trainings and COVID-19 housing resource workshops via Zoom with social service agencies, direct service providers, and invested stakeholders. If your agency would find a short resource webinar or fair housing training helpful during this crisis please contact Shaznene Hussain, the Center’s Education and Outreach Coordinator, at Shussain@ctfairhousing.org

Still needed to ensure housing stability:

  • Help for tenants who cannot pay their rent.
  • Payments to landlords to allow them to maintain their buildings and continue to provide housing.
  • Bar on mortgage companies filing foreclosure complaints. 857 have been filed since the Governor declared a public health and civil preparedness emergency, including several that are banned by the agreement banks and credit unions struck with the Governor and the Department of Banking.
  • Municipalities need to comply with Executive Order 7S and make it easy for their constituents to participate in either a tax deferral or reduced interest program.

More external COVID-19 resources can be found on our website here.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR FAIR HOUSING RIGHTS IN ENGLISH, SPANISH, MANDARIN, VIETNAMESE, FARSI, RUSSIAN, ITALIAN, KREYOL, ARABIC, KHMER, AND TAGALOG, CLICK HERE.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER (@CTFAIRHOUSING) FOR UPDATES THROUGHOUT THE DAY.

 

Fair Housing COVID-19 Response 4.30.20

ADDRESSING CLIENTS’ NEEDS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

April 30, 2020

Important Deadlines:  Tenants who know they cannot pay May rent must notify their landlord in writing by May 10, 2020 that they can’t pay rent due to full or partial unemployment, or significant loss in revenue or increase in expenses due to the pandemic to get a 60-day extension to pay the rent.

For letter and text templates to your landlord, click here.

Resources for tenants and homeowners:

  • Click here to understand current tenant rent relief options in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to find more details in our tenant FAQ.
  • Click here to understand current rights for homeowners in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to understand how fair housing can protect you during the COVID-19 crisis. (Recently added Tagalog and Khmer translations to our guidance now available in 11 languages.)
  • Need to have your subsidized rent recalculated due to income loss? The Rent Recalculation Request tool can be accessed here in Spanish and English.
  • To sign up for our daily update fill out the form

 

Fair housing issues and COVID-19:

  • Landlords have been refusing to do needed repair work in apartments because they believe the tenant has COVID-19. If the tenant is disabled, this may be housing discrimination. For more information about the fair housing rights of people who are disabled in Spanish and English, click here. If the repair is an emergency or is severely interfering with your use of the apartment, call the Board of Health in your town. They are still required to act on emergencies.
  • April is Fair Housing Month! The federal Fair Housing Act was passed on April 11, 1968 and was designed to stop individual acts of discrimination as well as to tasking federal, state, and local governments with promoting integration.  If you think you have been the victim of housing discrimination, call the Center at (888)247-440 or email us at info@ctfairhousing.org.

 

 

 

What happened on April 29, 2020:

  • Unemployment continues to surge: More people have filed for unemployment benefits this week as people continue to shelter in place and businesses remain closed. The need for assistance for tenants and landlords will also spike in the next few weeks as more tenants are unable to pay rent and landlords are unable to pay taxes or maintain their properties. For more on the story click here. For information on how the Center and the civil legal services agencies in Connecticut are asking the State to assist landlords and tenants during this crisis, click
  • Municipalities not receiving federal assistance: Despite the CARES Act which passed in March and was designed to provide some assistance to local governments, municipalities in Connecticut are reporting they have not yet received any money. In fact, all are reporting large drops in income as the result of the Governor’s order granting tax relief to residents. Many municipalities will not collect the real estate taxes they are owed without rental market stabilization funds that helps tenant pay rent. For more on this story, click here.
  • Tenants cannot pay rent: As May 1 approaches, more tenants are reporting they will be unable to pay the rent. Even those tenants receiving stimulus money and unemployment benefits report that they must use that money to buy food for their families. To read more about the growing rent crisis, click here and here and here.
  • Borrowers need clarification on forbearance repayments: While Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac each issued statements that borrowers are not required to repay the payments missed during a forbearance all at once when the forbearance period ends, many other loan services have not given that directive to their borrowers. Many borrowers in forbearance have been told they must come up with a lump sum payment at the end of the forbearance period or face foreclosure. For more on this story, click here. For more information on the guidance sent out by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, click here.
  • Mortgages in forbearance continue to grow: The Mortgage Bankers Association’s latest survey on forbearance volume reveals that the total number mortgages in forbearances rose to 6.99%, with FHA/VA loans at nearly 10%. Analysts expect these numbers to grow once again when May mortgage payments become due. For more information on this story, click here.
  • Outreach: Stay tuned for two important webinars coming soon. We will present on COVID-19 related housing discrimination and temporary eviction protections.
  • Outreach: Staff continue to hold fair housing trainings and COVID-19 housing resource workshops via Zoom with social service agencies, direct service providers, and invested stakeholders. If your agency would find a short resource webinar or fair housing training helpful during this crisis please contact Shaznene Hussain, the Center’s Education and Outreach Coordinator, at Shussain@ctfairhousing.org

 

Still needed to ensure housing stability:

 

  • Help for tenants who cannot pay their rent.
  • Payments to landlords to allow them to maintain their buildings and continue to provide housing.
  • Bar on mortgage companies filing foreclosure complaints. More than 625 have been filed since the Governor declared a public health and civil preparedness emergency, including several that are banned by the agreement banks and credit unions struck with the Governor and the Department of Banking.
  • Municipalities need to comply with Executive Order 7S and make it easy for their constituents to participate in either a tax deferral or reduced interest program.

 

More external COVID-19 resources can be found on our website here.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR FAIR HOUSING RIGHTS IN ENGLISH, SPANISH, MANDARIN, VIETNAMESE, FARSI, RUSSIAN, ITALIAN, KREYOL, ARABIC, KHMER, AND TAGALOG, CLICK HERE.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER (@CTFAIRHOUSING) FOR UPDATES THROUGHOUT THE DAY.

Fair Housing COVID-19 Response 4.29.20

If you would like to view a PDF of this update click here.

ADDRESSING CLIENTS’ NEEDS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

April 29, 2020

If you would like to view a PDF of this update click here.

Important Deadlines:  Tenants who know they cannot pay May rent must notify their landlord in writing by May 10, 2020 that they can’t pay rent due to full or partial unemployment, or significant loss in revenue or increase in expenses due to the pandemic to get a 60-day extension to pay the rent.

Resources for tenants and homeowners:

  • Click here to understand current tenant rent relief options in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to find more details in our tenant FAQ.
  • Click here to understand current rights for homeowners in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to understand how fair housing can protect you during the COVID-19 crisis. (Recently added Tagalog and Khmer translations to our guidance now available in 11 languages.)
  • Need to have your subsidized rent recalculated due to income loss? The Rent Recalculation Request tool can be accessed here in Spanish and English.
  • To sign up for our daily update fill out the form

Fair housing issues and COVID-19:

  • April is Fair Housing Month! The federal Fair Housing Act was passed on April 11, 1968 and was designed to stop individual acts of discrimination as well as to tasking federal, state, and local governments with promoting integration.  If you think you have been the victim of housing discrimination, call the Center at (888)247-440 or email us at info@ctfairhousing.org.

What happened on April 28, 2020:

  • Advocates ask Department of Housing to create a program to help tenants who cannot pay rent: The Connecticut Department of Housing published a notice of how it planned to spend its portion of CARES Act funding. The Center and the civil legal services agencies in Connecticut provided comments asking that that DOH spend additional CARES Act funds on an eviction prevention program. To see a copy of the comments submitted to DOH, click
  • Connecticut Latinos face high infection rates: The U.S. Labor Department estimated that 32% of Latinos in Connecticut were working on service industry jobs. As a result, those that have not been laid off are facing high rates of infection from COVID-19. Latinos account for 33.8% of all deaths from COVID-19 compared with just 17.2% of Whites. African-Americans account for 39% of all deaths from the virus. For more on this story, click here.
  • Tenants cannot pay rent: As May 1 approaches, more tenants are reporting they will be unable to pay the rent. Even those tenants receiving stimulus money and unemployment benefits report that they must use that money to buy food for their families. To read more about the growing rent crisis, click here and here and here.
  • Borrowers need clarification on forbearance repayments: While Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac each issued statements that borrowers are not required to repay the payments missed during a forbearance all at once when the forbearance period ends, many other loan services have not given that directive to their borrowers. Many borrowers in forbearance have been told they must come up with a lump sum payment at the end of the forbearance period or face foreclosure. For more on this story, click here. For more information on the guidance sent out by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, click here.
  • Mortgages in forbearance continue to grow: The Mortgage Bankers Association’s latest survey on forbearance volume reveals that the total number mortgages in forbearances rose to 6.99%, with FHA/VA loans at nearly 10%. Analysts expect these numbers to grow once again when May mortgage payments become due. For more information on this story, click here.
  • Outreach: Stay tuned for two important webinars coming soon. We will present on COVID-19 related housing discrimination and temporary eviction protections.
  • Outreach: Staff continue to hold fair housing trainings and COVID-19 housing resource workshops via Zoom with social service agencies, direct service providers, and invested stakeholders. If your agency would find a short resource webinar or fair housing training helpful during this crisis please contact Shaznene Hussain, the Center’s Education and Outreach Coordinator, at Shussain@ctfairhousing.org

Still needed to ensure housing stability:

  • Help for tenants who cannot pay their rent.
  • Payments to landlords to allow them to maintain their buildings and continue to provide housing.
  • Bar on mortgage companies filing foreclosure complaints. More than 625 have been filed since the Governor declared a public health and civil preparedness emergency, including several that are banned by the agreement banks and credit unions struck with the Governor and the Department of Banking.
  • Municipalities need to comply with Executive Order 7S and make it easy for their constituents to participate in either a tax deferral or reduced interest program.

More external COVID-19 resources can be found on our website here.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR FAIR HOUSING RIGHTS IN ENGLISH, SPANISH, MANDARIN, VIETNAMESE, FARSI, RUSSIAN, ITALIAN, KREYOL, ARABIC, KHMER, AND TAGALOG, CLICK HERE.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER (@CTFAIRHOUSING) FOR UPDATES THROUGHOUT THE DAY.

Fair Housing Response COVID-19 4.28.20

ADDRESSING CLIENTS’ NEEDS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

April 28, 2020

Important Deadlines:  Tenants who know they cannot pay May rent must notify their landlord in writing by May 10, 2020 that they can’t pay rent due to full or partial unemployment, or significant loss in revenue or increase in expenses due to the pandemic to get a 60-day extension to pay the rent.

Connecticut’s legal services offices will hold a briefing on COVID-19 related housing issues on April 29, 2020 at 12:30 p.m. Send questions in advance to housingbriefing@ctlegal.org and click here to register for the briefing.

Resources for tenants and homeowners:

  • Click here to understand current tenant rent relief options in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to find more details in our tenant FAQ.
  • Click here to understand current rights for homeowners in Spanish and English.
  • Click here to understand how fair housing can protect you during the COVID-19 crisis. (Recently added Tagalog and Khmer translations to our guidance now available in 11 languages.)
  • Need to have your subsidized rent recalculated due to income loss? The Rent Recalculation Request tool can be accessed here in Spanish and English.
  • To sign up for our daily update fill out the form

Fair housing issues and COVID-19:

  • April is Fair Housing Month! The federal Fair Housing Act was passed on April 11, 1968 and was designed to stop individual acts of discrimination as well as to tasking federal, state, and local governments with promoting integration. If you think you have been the victim of housing discrimination, call the Center at (888)247-440 or email us at info@ctfairhousing.org.
  • A landlord is not allowed to charge an extra month’s security deposit because you are paying with a voucher or because you are paying rent with a RAP or Section 8 voucher. If you suspect you are being treated differently because you have a security deposit voucher or a voucher to pay the rent, call the Center at (888)247-4401 or by email at info@ctfairhousing.org. Read more about source of income discrimination by clicking here for information in both Spanish and English.

What happened on April 27, 2020:

  • Tenants cannot pay rent: As May 1 approaches, more tenants are reporting they will be unable to pay the rent. Even those tenants receiving stimulus money and unemployment benefits report that they must use that money to buy food for their families. To read more about the growing rent crisis, click here and here and here.
  • Rental assistance voucher administrator changes policies: D’Amelia has changed its policies regarding its administration of the State’s housing choice voucher administrator to ensure that tenants are able to stay in their homes or lease up using their vouchers (also known as Section 8) or RAP certificates. Those changes include:
  1. YEARLY ANNUAL INSPECTIONS: ALL annual inspections for both RAP and Section 8 participants are postponed.
  2. INTIAL INSPECTIONS: Initial inspections and Other Change of Unit inspections will be completed if the unit is unoccupied. This ensures that individuals who are homeless will continue to be able to access housing.
  3. PREVIOUSLY FAILED INSPECTIONS: If a unit has previously failed an inspection (Reinspections/Abatements), inspectors will NOT go back out to the unit. J. D’Amelia will accept documentation from the landlord and tenant that the work has been completed.
  4. ANNUAL RECERTIFICATIONS, INTERIMS, MOVES: The JDA Waterbury and New Haven offices are closed to the public, as are most of the other 7 offices. Staff are getting annual recertifications, interims, and moves electronically.  D’Amelia is accepting documents via fax, email, or US mail, and communicating by telephone.
  5. TERMINATIONS: Proposed terminations and hearings are placed on HOLD for at least 60 days.
  6. EXTENSIONS: Extensions on Section 8 Vouchers and RAP Certificates are extended at least 60 days without notification from the applicant.
  7. BRIEFINGS: J. D’Amelia staff are conducting briefings via skype, facetime or telephone. D’Amelia staff will email the caseworkers and/or applicants a briefing packet and then work with the caseworker and client to review the materials.
  8. INCOME DECREASES: If a RAP or Section 8 participants has a decrease in income an interim adjustment should be completed immediately. D’Amelia is waiving the “out of work for at least 30 days” and the “letter notification from employer” as well.  For example, if a tenant cannot get a letter that their job has shut down, the tenant can self-verify. J. D’Amelia staff will document the COVID-19 related reason for the use of self-verification.
  9. REPAYMENTS: J. D’Amelia is waiving current repayment invoice payments for 90 days.
  10. IDENTIFICATION: Whenever possible, the applicant should provide copies of photo identification, birth certification, and verification of social security.  D’Amelia and the Department of Housing are aware that due to the closure of Dept. of Motor Vehicle offices, obtaining photo identification is a challenge. If client does not have photo identification, then a copy of birth certificate and social security number is acceptable.
  • District of Connecticut federal courts to remain closed through June 15: Any in person hearing scheduled between now and June 15 has been continued until further order of the Court. The District of Connecticut courthouses remain open for business. Court staff not physically present at the courthouse are equipped to work remotely and will work normal hours during each business day. Staff in the Clerk’s Office are available by telephone, mail will be received, and paper filings can be made at the entrance to each courthouse.
  • Borrowers in forbearance have time to pay missed payments: Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac each issued statements that borrowers are not required to repay the payments missed during a forbearance all at once when the forbearance period ends. For more information, click here.
  • Mortgages in forbearance continue to grow: The number of mortgages in forbearance increased from 5.5% on April 16 to 6.4% on April 24. This is compared to only .25% of all loans in forbearance as of March 2, 2020. This has resulted in $754 billion in unpaid principal and interest. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac report that 5.6% of their loans are in forbearance while Ginnie Mae reports that 8.9% of all FHA/VA loans are in forbearance. For more information, click here.
  • Changes to procedures for
  • Outreach: Staff continue to hold fair housing trainings and COVID-19 housing resource workshops via Zoom with social service agencies, direct service providers, and invested stakeholders. If your agency would find a short resource webinar or fair housing training helpful during this crisis please contact Shaznene Hussain, the Center’s Education and Outreach Coordinator, at Shussain@ctfairhousing.org

Still needed to ensure housing stability:

  • Help for tenants who cannot pay their rent.
  • Payments to landlords to allow them to maintain their buildings and continue to provide housing.
  • Bar on mortgage companies filing foreclosure complaints. More than 625 have been filed since the Governor declared a public health and civil preparedness emergency, including several that are banned by the agreement banks and credit unions struck with the Governor and the Department of Banking.

More external COVID-19 resources can be found on our website here.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR FAIR HOUSING RIGHTS IN ENGLISH, SPANISH, MANDARIN, VIETNAMESE, FARSI, RUSSIAN, ITALIAN, KREYOL, ARABIC, KHMER, AND TAGALOG, CLICK HERE.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER (@CTFAIRHOUSING) FOR UPDATES THROUGHOUT THE DAY.

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