Evictions During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Updated as of September 28, 2021

Connecticut’s Ban on Evictions and the National CDC Ban on Evictions Have Ended.  


What does this mean for tenants? 

This means your landlord can start an eviction case against you.  

But in Connecticut there are still some special protections for tenants through February 15, 2022 that may help you access rental assistance and stay in your home.  Rental assistance is available through UniteCT. The button below will link to the UniteCT homepage where you can apply and learn more about the program.


The buttons below link to the current rules and what you can do if your landlord starts an eviction case against you.

Current rules for starting eviction cases 

  1. A landlord must complete an application for UniteCT, Connecticut’s rental assistance program, before beginning the eviction process for nonpayment of rent.
  1. A marshal can not serve you with a Notice to Quit for not paying rent until the landlord has completed an application for UniteCT. The Notice to Quit must include your landlord’s UniteCT case number to prove they applied.
  1. Notices to Quit for not paying rent, and most other reasons, must give you at least 30 days from the day you received the notice to move before an eviction court case can be started.
  1. If you receive a Notice to Quit for not paying rent, you also have 30 days from the day you receive it to pay what you owe (either using your own money or rental assistance funds). If you pay what you owe within the 30 days, your landlord can not start an eviction court case against you for the overdue rent.
  1. All Notices to Quit must be delivered with information about UniteCT in both English and Spanish.

Reminder: You never have to move by the date given on the Notice to Quit. If you do not move by the date on the Notice to Quit and you did not repay the overdue rent, your landlord must start and win an eviction court case to get the court’s permission to evict you. For more information on how to respond to eviction papers , read the CTLawHelp.org article on Evictions and Lockouts and call Statewide Legal Services for legal help: 1-800-453-3320 (Monday – Friday, 9 am – 12 pm & 1 pm – 2 pm).

If you apply for UniteCT, the court must put your eviction court case on hold for 30 days or until a decision is made on the application.

  1. If you or your landlord applies for UniteCT rental assistance during any eviction court case (except those filed for serious nuisance), the court must put all parts of the case on hold for 30 days or until the UniteCT decision is approved or denied, whichever is earlier. The 30-day stay applies even if judgment has already entered. But to get this 30-day hold, you must tell the court in writing that you have applied for UniteCT.  (See the next section for instructions and a form you can use to tell the court about your application.)
  1. If the UniteCT application is approved, the court must put the case on hold until the UniteCT payment is made and the case is withdrawn by your landlord.  
  1. If your landlord receives a UniteCT payment, your landlord must give paperwork to the court to officially withdraw (meaning end) the eviction court case against you.

What can tenants with eviction court cases filed against them do?

  1. Apply for UniteCT rental assistance: If you apply for UniteCT and your case is for anything other than serious nuisance, the court must put your case on hold for 30 days or until a decision is made on your application, whichever is earlier.
    • You can apply to UniteCT by going to www.bit.ly/UniteCT and clicking “Apply Now.” If you need help completing the online application, call one of the UniteCT Resource Centers in your area or call 2-1-1 for a referral.
    • Write down your UniteCT case number so you can share it with the court.
    • Reminder: Even if your current landlord refuses to accept the UniteCT assistance, it may cover a security deposit and 12 months future rent to be paid to a new landlord. It may also cover utility payments.
  2. Tell the Court you applied for UniteCT ASAP: The court will only put the case on hold only if you tell them in writing that you have applied for UniteCT. To notify the court:
    • You can use this UniteCT notice form. (The form below and linked in text.)
      • Fill out, print, and sign the form. (If you don’t know your UniteCT case number, you can find it by logging back into your application: https://ctdoh.rentrelief.com/content2/access/login)
      • Next, hand deliver or fax it to the Clerk’s Office at the court handling your case.
      • Then, mail, email, or hand-deliver a copy of the form to your landlord’s lawyer (or directly to your landlord if they don’t have a lawyer) and any other tenants who submitted Appearance forms.

Use the form below to tell the court you have applied for UniteCT.

3. Apply for legal help by calling Statewide Legal Services at 1-800-453-3320 (Monday – Friday, 9 am – 12 pm & 1 pm – 2 pm)

4. Respond to eviction papers and attend any remote court events. The eviction process moves quickly. But if you respond to the papers and participate in the case, you may be able to stay in your home or get more time to move. Read the CTLawHelp article on Evictions and Lockouts for more information.

5. Call your local UniteCT Resource Center and request to speak with an Eviction Specialist. They may be able to help speed up the review of your application. For Resource Center phone numbers and more information, visit: https://portal.ct.gov/DOH/DOH/Programs/UniteCT—Tenants-facing-Eviction

What can tenants that have already recieved an Execution do now? 

If you lost your eviction case and the Execution (order that allows the marshal to evict you) you may still qualify for an additional 30-day hold on your case if you apply for UniteCT. To qualify for a 30 day hold you must take action before the date and time of your scheduled move out (this information is on the copy of the Execution the marshal leaves at your door )You should immediately:

  1. Call Statewide Legal Services at 1-800-453-3320 (Open Monday – Friday, 9 am – 12 pm & 1 pm – 2 pm) for legal help. You may be able to ask the court to temporarily stop the marshal and hold a hearing by filling out and delivering the emergency “audita” application at the Court Clerk’s Office.
  2. If your landlord started the eviction case for any reason other than serious nuisance, apply for Unite CT and use this emergency audita application packet to tell the court you applied for UniteCT and to ask that the court temporarily stop the marshal from using the Execution.

Emergency Audita Application

If the court has already issued the Execution (order that allows the marshal to physically remove you), use the emergency “audita” packet below to tell the court if you have applied for UniteCT and ask the court to stop the marshal from using the Execution until a hearing is held.


3. Call the Court Clerk’s Office if you have any questions about the status of your case.

4. Call 2-1-1 and press #3 and #1 for information about available housing and shelter assistance.

5. Prepare to move: Unless an emergency “audita” application is delivered to the Court Clerk’s Office and the judge orders the marshal to hold off, the marshal will proceed to move all your remaining belongings to a storage facility on the date and time listed on the Execution.

Try to pack and move as much as you can before the scheduled move out. Focus first on packing your essentials – like medications and ID cards – so you always have them with you. After the marshal moves your things into storage, your town must hold them there for at least 15 days. Call your town for more information on how long they will hold your things and is they charge any fees.

Note: The marshal must give you at least 24 hours’ notice of the date and time of the eviction. This information will be on the Execution order left at your door. On the date and time of the eviction, the marshal will move all remaining belongings to a storage facility. Your town must hold your things in storage for at least 15 days. Call your town hall for more information on how long they will hold belongings and if they charge any fees.


Reminders and protections

  • Your landlord is not allowed to lock you out, remove your belongings, or cut off utilities, even if you owe rent. Your landlord must go through the court process. Only a state marshal with an order from the court may physically remove you from your home.

For more information about the State of Connecticut’s COVID-19 protections for tenants see Governor Lamont’s Executive Order 12D, extended through February 15, by Executive Order 14.

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